2020 GE MR Programming Workshop


The 2020 UW-GE MR Programming Workshop will occur in an online-only format later this fall. We will post an update on this site by June 11th, 2020. Please return on or after this date for additional information.


 

GE MR Programming Workshop (EPIC and Orchestra)

September 7th – October 19th, 2020

Key Concepts to be Presented

  • Introduction to basic GE EPIC software design
  • EPIC pulse sequence development tools
  • How to modify pulse sequences
  • Steps needed to run a research pulse sequence
  • Image reconstruction using GE Orchestra SDK (MATLAB and C++)
  • Introduction to data structures used in Orchestra
  • Setting up a local EPIC and Orchestra environment
  • Networking with peers as well as experts from UW and GE

Audience

This workshop is designed for beginners learning how to use the pulse sequence and reconstruction tools available for researchers on the GE MR platforms. However, a solid understanding of the following concepts is expected:

  • Magnetic resonance imaging physics
  • Unix Operating System
  • C/C++ and MATLAB programming
  • Basic operation of GE MR scanner
  • Basic electronics

Registration

Registration is not yet available, but is expected to be available in June 2020.

To be eligible for the Workshop, your institution must have an active EPIC License agreement with GE Healthcare. If not, please contact the course organizers before registering. For UW personnel and GE employees, please also contact the course organizers directly for confirmation before registering.

Please contact the course organizers at ge-mr-programming@lists.wisc.edu or Ellen Morin at (608) 265-3422 with any questions regarding registration.

Instructors

Ty Cashen, MD, PhD, is a GE scientist on the body/vascular applications team and has been with GE since 2009. Dr. Cashen is also an honorary fellow based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is currently working on motion-robust, dynamic, and accelerated MR imaging.

Jim Holmes, PhD, is a scientist in the Department of Radiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Previously, he was with GE Healthcare and based in Madison. He is currently working on body and breast imaging including motion-robust dynamic imaging, non-Cartesian methods, and magnetization transfer.

Sam Hurley, PhD, is a scientist in the Departments of Radiology and has been with the University of Wisconsin since 2016. He is also an honorary fellow at the University of Oxford. Dr. Hurley’s work focuses on neuroimaging, including modeling of simultaneously acquired functional and molecular PET/MR data.

Alan McMillan, PhD, is a faculty member in the Department of Radiology and has been with the University of Wisconsin since 2012. Dr. McMillan is currently working on magnetic resonance based methods for molecular imaging, including PET/MR.

Kang Wang, PhD, is an applications engineer and has been with GE since 2011.